Flipped classroom: A new academic concept

Flipped classroom: A new academic concept

Flipped classrooms are one of the latest trends in the world of education because of their power to radically transform the way students learn.  No, flipping a classroom does not involve moving the desks around. A flipped classroom takes the traditional learning structure and turns it around. Instead of giving students information during class time and sending them home with homework, students get the information at home and do the homework and other practice activities in class. While flipped classrooms may sound odd, there are multiple reasons they can improve how students learn.Flipped classrooms make sure students get in critical practice time. Students do not always complete homework, may rush through assignments or get more help than necessary from a parent, friend or sibling. In a flipped classroom, students do not have to find time to complete assignments and teachers can guarantee they are doing the work on their own.

Flipped classrooms give students more opportunities for one-on-one time with their teachers. As students work through problems, their teachers can see where they have difficulty and address it during the process. Students can also ask questions directly to the teacher during the process.

Flipped classrooms engage students. Lectures, reading from textbooks and generally conveying information can be boring. A flipped classroom decreases the amount of time students spend getting information and increases the amount of time they spend doing hands-on activities and practice. This keeps them engaged during class time. At home, students are motivated to review the material because they know it is necessary to complete the in-class activities the next day.